HSM 2017 – The rest of the year (Aug-Dec)

I always find it hard to plan a full year of sewing ni adwance, since so much can happen that will change your creative drift and interest.
So this year I only made plans for the first half of the “Historical sew Monthly“.

But as summer’s now upon us I think it is time to take a new look at the uppcoming challenges, and to try to figure out what I wan’t to create for the ending of this year.

August:
Ridiculous
Make something that was considered outrageous in its own time, or is just utterly ridiculous to modern eyes.

There are SOoo many things yuu could do here, like 1880s bustles, 1890s mutton-sleeves, 17th century trunkhose ore 1830s hairs (already done that:-).
But for this challenge I will try to finish my Robe a la Franchaise that I begunn in 2014.21b6904ef6a12a9a9d65e486ef558bfdIt’s not silly looking per se, but the panniers that it will go over are a bit cazy

September:
Seen Onscreen
Be inspired by period fashions as shown onscreen (film or TV), and recreate your favorite historical costume as a historically accurate period piece.

I’ve been wanting to make myself some more 17th century garb and now might be a good oppurtunity to get to it.
elizabeth-capell-countess-of-carnarvon-ca-1665-sir-peter-lely I’m thinking maybe a new 1860s bodice (since I already have a pattern)
Or maybe someting a bit more daring like a mantua (I’ve hears a lot of Swedes arte doing these now a days…)

October:
Out of Your Comfort Zone
Create a garment from a time period you haven’t done before, or that uses a new skill or technique that you’ve never tried before.

This one is hard, but I’ve been wanting to give menswear a fair try, so why not now. k4202drwI already have a Regency west cut and waiting, and if I can find the time I would love to also make a pair of breechers and a shirt.

November:
HSF Inspiration
Be inspired by something that has been made for the HSF over the years to make your own fabulous item.

 There are so many gorgeous and inpireing entrys to the HSF/HSM, that it would be almost inpossible to choose only one.
That I think I will approach this from the other angle – to decide the garment first, by going through my stash and then find the right inspiration from the comunity.

December:
Go Wild
You can interpret this challenge as an excuse to make something that incorporates animal print, or wild animals in some way, or to simply make something wild and over the top.

I also been craving an 15th century Burgundian gown for myself, and since those often are decorated with fur, it would be the perfect choise. spinning-women1

As you sure can guess, I’m planing a lot more costumes this year, 3 of which are already well on their way, that don’t fit into the scheduel that is the HSM.

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Historic Pregnancy Wear

As my urge to sew slowly seep back into my body, I find myself looking at another type of fashions then before – namely maternety dresses through history.

Even though I probably never will get the time to sew, and even les to wear them – here are some of the beauties I´ve found.

images(Yes I know, its comonly said that this weeding portrait comes without childbearing gifts, but you got to agree with me´- eiter that´s a lot of cokies, padding or she´s been honoring those wedding vovs for quite a while…)
I would love to wear something simular to the medieval fair late may – if i have the strenght to go.

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99f0c1525ae4f83fae85088048e9ee90Dreamy – and would work both with and without a baby bump

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tumblr_m0qnmbmEJC1qbkn6io1_500Ok, not the most comfortable thing to wear, but it do looks good.

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Austria2This “I only button the top”thing, works just as well in the 16th century as it does today with knit cardigans.

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Images of pregnancy maternity fashion - 17th 18th 19th century maternity style

c511f98c3f2bfec60ee6b59a5b7e8e4b“Lets just hide everything” is a look that only works for paintings – and instagram photos…

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969e4d687c637f87c23984dee3539077Not sure if I´m most facinated by the womans figure or the mans outfit…

Do you have any favourite pictures of maternity wear?

Outlander dress inspiration

This past year I’ve followed the fenomen of “Outlander” with interest.

I’ve watched the series, read the analysis and discussions about the costumes, and smiled at the world wide drooling over Sam Heughan.
And of course admired all the fabulous recreations of the clothing’s from the show.

But it wasn’t until recently I found myself dreaming of my very own highlander/Clare costume.
It started late august.
I was going through my fabric stash for some creative impulses, when I found a piece of lovely plaid wool, in shades of dark green and navy, that might be just enough for a full skirt.
And there, right beside, a piece of perfectly matching left over beige wool that wouldn’t be enough for anything more then a small jacket, perhaps 18th century…
Yep, you see where I’m going here.

So onto Pinterest I went:

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355cff34b471477934399d8c8a14a566One of few back views

113df6a2fa677ee4eb31bb5ccaf5f374Close-up showing the hooks and bars that keeps the stomacher in place.

c26db7014bdcad3b3995e84fc3b1a71bAnd you got to love the cosy knitwear.

Plastique Fantastique – inspiration

This spring, some of the most awesome historical nerds I knew posted an event on Facebook called:

Plastique Fantastique!

And described it as a meetup/picnic for everyone who’s tired of the whole “Historical accurate” discussion:
“Trött och ängslig att du inte är HK? Har du innerst inne närt en dröm om att bära den där fantastiska Marie Antoinetteskapelsen i vit glansig nylon? Nu kan du kasta korsett och siden! Klä dig i polyester och kardborrband!
Välkomna till Plastique Fantastique!”
(“Tired of worrying about Historical accuracy? Do you dream about that awesome Marie Antoinette gown in shining polyester? Lets throw away the corset and the silk! Adorn yourself in Poly and Velcro!
Welcome to Plastique Fantastique!”
10931471_10152688327264372_9050406982234957925_n(Yep, the text’s all about ironic, and humor)

Since I love all the quirky and crazy side of costuming as much as the hand finishing, of course I wanted in.

A quick googling gave me overloads of beautiful (if not totally historical accurate) versions of the 18th century.
Enjoy!

Lets start with the o so lovely masquerade costumes:
girls_aloud_-_cant_speak_french18th century Halloween costumes – because nothing says 18th century like short skirts and high heels…
(also, read my rant on over sexulized female costumes here)

images (2)Who can resit a purple polyester perm?

1403sexysuperdeluxemarieantoinettecostum“I’m a 18th century pirate wench” (in gold lame and pink…)

34632You just got to love the lovely polyester shine…

6317955-mid-adult-women-in-18th-century-style-dress-woman-century-queenDoes she have a table under that skirt?

marie-antoinetteOh, that’s one way to use grandmas curtains…

18-century-dress-5875693Gold and bows – what can go wrong?

Then there are some fine examples of movie costumes:fantomens-stjrna-i-rsa_57494828Stage costume from “The Phantom of he opera” (2004) – It’s got extra everything! I love it!

087918th century Velvet and gold through 1950s eyes.

And couture:images (6)John Galliano for Dior fall/winter 2000/2001

And dress patterns:79_1simp_marieChange the fabric, remove the zipper and make he stomacher detachable and you do get a pretty good looking 18th century gown – but for now It fit perfectly for my purposes

Then there are the ones that’s more like beautiful art pieces then costumes:Marie-Antoinette-in-Paris-325What is that marvelous material?

1520797_387418951435365_8312075050876152832_nI just got to have those lips!

10917033_387418898102037_1681442576664186359_n“Mm, cake…”

misssisterrosevioletfacebookPastels, huge hair and heart shaped mouches – whats not o love?

167336_1541549979585_4685664_nSaucy…

Fuyu-Corset-1-bd“Ops, I forgot my dress” (so beautiful)

aab1bdf17a21312e28ca6d57bb422c7a“It need some more height, don’t you think Monsieur Léonard?”

tumblr_mq3nfm701p1ri8bwro1_500Lady in (hair)distress

PRIChESKA-pod-parusomGhostly beautiful. Is that paper?

largeCrinoline pirate

marie_antoinette_garden_gown_1_by_johanna449-d41pqs3And Asian styled Antoinette

a557012d57e6302990b71825d96e6669The Kraken!

originalShip ahoy!

orig-11834371“Let them eat cake!”
I need to try this sometime  – any volunteers?

dior18thcenturyCouture (clearly influential by Sofia Coppola…)

tumblr_n2qpfp8KID1qbukmqo1_1280Promo pic from “Marie Antoinette” (2006)

“Sew 17th Century Challenge” – Finding my Painting

Last fall Isis from “Isis Wardrobe” started the “17th century Challenge” to encourage more interest and recreation of 17th century fashion.
(As she explain in her blog post (see above) the idea comes from Maria of “In deme jare cristi” who started the “Manuscript challenge“.)

I immediately liked the idea, since I’ve been pondering on making a 17th century dress for some time and this seamed the perfect excuse.
(This project also fit perfectly into the HSM15 challenge “Out of your comfort zone” due in June)

The rules for the “Sew 17th century challenge” are simple:
*Pick a painting or original garment from 1600-1699, and upload your picture to the Facebook album
*You got 1 year to recreate the painting (every piece of clothing) as close as you can considering, skills, time and budget.
*Present your garment in the Facebook album and tell a bit about the process.
(read the in dept rules at “Isis Wardrobe”)

So this winter I took a good look at what internet had to provide in terms of 17th century fashions.

While searching I discovered some of the typical styles in (women’s) fashion painted in the 17th century.

The extremely elaborate court robe:

(c) The Royal Hospital Chelsea; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Catherine of Braganza (c) The Royal Hospital Chelsea; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

The goddess drape:1671 Louise de Kérouaille by Sir Peter Lely “Louise de Kérouaille” by Sir Peter Lely (1671)

The crazy as panniers court dress:1660s Ines de Zúñiga, condesa de Monterrey by Juan Carreno de Miranda “Ines de Zúñiga, condesa de Monterrey” by Juan Carreno de Miranda (1660s)

The “simple” high waist:1632 yellow dress“Yellow dress” (1632)

The extremely elaborate high waist:Susanna Temple ca. 1604-1669 (later m. Lady Thornhurst and m. Lady Lister) by Marcus Gheeraerts, 1620sSusanna Temple ca. 1604-1669″  by Marcus Gheeraerts, (ca 1620)

The crazy as embroidery:  Portrait of Margaret Layton, attributed to Marcus Gheeraerts, c. 1620. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London“Portrait of Margaret Layton”, attributed to Marcus Gheeraerts, c. 1620. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London
I would love to make this one from the recreation of this fabric some day, But not right now. 

The 16th century lingerer:Frans Pourbus the younger, Portrait of Margaret of Savoy, Duchess of Mantua, 1608Portrait of Margaret of Savoy, Duchess of Mantua” by Frans Pourbus the younger (1608)

The “Poor” people dress:Mother Combing Child's Hair by Caspar Netscher (1669)Mother Combing Child’s Hair” by Caspar Netscher (1669)

The rigid and “simple” dress: Peter Lely. Portrait of Elizabeth Wriothesley, Countess of Northumberland, and later Countess of Montagu, 1668. “Portrait of Elizabeth Wriothesley, Countess of Northumberland, and later Countess of Montagu”, by Peter Lely (1668)

The rigid and lace decorated gown:Portrait of a Lady by Gabriel MetsuPortrait of a Lady” by Gabriel Metsu (ca 1660s)

Even though I can see something charming in almost every one of these fashions (maybe except the “crazy as panniers” – I mean what is that), but I’m definitely drawn to the 1660s “simpler” styles of dress.

So focusing on portraits from that period I still had to narrow it down to just one favorite.

Elizabeth Capell, Countess of Carnarvon, ca. 1665 (Sir Peter Lely)Elizabeth Capell, Countess of Carnarvon by Sir Peter Lely (ca. 1665)

(c) Enfield Museum Service; Supplied by The Public Catalogue FoundationPrincess Henrietta Anne of England (1644–1670) by Jan Mytens (1665)

While both lovely, I knew I wanted to make something a bit more basic and les fancy.

Not loving the dress color, besides I could never get over how bald she looks in the mirror.Woman at a Mirror 1650” Woman at a Mirror” (1650)

This one would be perfect if I could ever find those golden ribbons (yeah, as if…)The Glass of Wine (detail), c.1661, Johannes Vermeer.The Glass of Wine” (detail), by  Johannes Vermeer (c.1661)

Perfect!
Gerard_ter_Borch_(II) - The_Concert ca. 1675The Concert” by Gerard ter Borch (II) – (ca. 1675)
Yep, That’s the one

You can find my Pinterest board for the “Sew 17th century challenge”here.

1850s Summer Dresses – Inspiration

This spring I’ve been exploring the 1850-1860s summer fashion for both me and my sister (read about her outfit here, here and here).

But I wanted a differnt look, or rater a more traditional simple yet stylish look. So I once more turned to the internet (bles you Pinterest) for some inspiration for 1840 – 1860s summer dresses.

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4dde92c307aba94f090ee0a106a6f62dmore of a 1835s style

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1850s blue printed cotton fan front

So much prettyness…

But if you follow me on facebook you already knew with one I choose to me my main inspiration.

1860s (ish) bonnet – Inspiration

After finishing my 1860s blouse I needed to make myself some suitable headwear, so I started searching for pretty bonnets online.
And found lots of gorgeous ones (many way out of my skill level to re-create) in several different styles ranging 1850-1867.

Staw bonnets:
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Fabric covered bonnets:26f329ca64f5ff4266ec7a97f3cf469b

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Sheer bonnets:1341ba1eddbd4fe80ee80a2f707f944e

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Shirred Bonnets: f222ada3e114e2f52479aee3ab95fb90

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7a42b6b21b6ade8740f6dc978540db72This is my main inspiration for my bonnet.