A Royal Cape – Fake it ’til you make it

To turn my Elizabeth I dress into something a bit more royal, I decided to make an ermine cape.

I originally wanted to make a coronation robe like the one my inspiration painting (below), but since I only got scraps left from the dress fabric, I opted for a simpler (and more theatrical/fake) style.

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I used my old cape pattern, and a soft white fake fur I bought a few years back to made a short cape.img_1313

Then I cut small pieces of a black fur trim I had in my stash and placed them on the cape to get the ermine look.img_1345Testing the spaces of the black “tails”.

Once I decided their placement I stitched them on by hand.img_1394

An hour later the cape was finished.img_1391

The finished cape:
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The facts:

What: A fake Ermine cape

Pattern: I drafted my own.

Fabric & Notions: 0,5 m white fake fur, 30 cm black fur trim, thread, hook and eye.

Time & Cost: 2 hours (1 hours to attach the black fur pieces), about 100 Sek (10 Usd)

Final Thoughts: Not one of my finest works, but it will do for its theatrical purpose.

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18th century Red Riding hood

About a month ago I decided I needed to make myself a 18th century cloak/cape

4d7ebb3a5de7f11a4aff68e52445404bLove this picture

I decided to use Baumgarters Cloak pattern from “Costume close-upIMG_5888

IMG_5883Sewing Empire made herself one of these too, and writes a good sumary about her work on her blog.

For fabric I used an old roll of red wool I got for free a few yers ago.   IMG_5870The fabric are realy coarse and I never thougt I would ever be able to use it for anything, particularly not for a garment.

For lining I dug into my scraps bin, and found a dark red linnen leftover from a gown I made several years ago.IMG_5878The amount I had was just enough for the hood.

I didn’t traced the pattern, but measured and cut everything from memory. IMG_5868

Then I did the same with the hood.IMG_5874

The construction of the cape was really simple and straight forward.
The only tricky part was the hood.IMG_5890Picture of back of hood from “Costume close-up”.

In the description it’s said to be pleats giving the “fan” shape, and after some fideling and testing, I figured out how to make them behave as in the picture above.IMG_5893 IMG_5895
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From the inside

Once I knew how to do it the lining was really easy to assemble in the same way.IMG_5899Even though the look of the folds in the thinner linen was a bit different.

IMG_6082It is huge, laying on the floor like this.

Finished:IMG_6061

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Just The Facts:

Challenge: nr 3/2015 – Stashbusting

What: a 18th century wool cape

Pattern: Baumgarters “Costume Close-ups” Cloak pattern

Fabric: 3 m of red wool (upholstery fabric) and 40 cm (scraps) of red linen for lining.

Notions: Thread and one hook and eye.

How historica accurate: So, so. The colour and look of it are right, but I doubt they would have used this type of coarse wool for anything other then isolation. I did handstitch the hole cloak but i used syntetic tread – since thats what I had in my stash. All in all I give it a 6/10.

Time: About 5-8 hours – it went pretty quick and only took me about a day to finish.

Cost: Basicly nothing – The fabric was gifted to me and the rest was all leftovers or old stash.
But if I would have bought everything new I guess 300-400 Sek (40Usd)

How it fits the Challenge: It is made completely from stash fabric and scraps. And since I never thought I’d be able to make something from the wool I’m extra happy that it turned out so lovely.

First Worn: On Feruary 28th, for photos.

Final Thougts: I Love it! I felt so pretty and coosy in it, and only wish I would have reason to wear it all the time.
And since I do have fabric left, I’m are already thinking on making one for my sister.

A Masquerade cape

As the HSF Challenge 22 Masquerade drew closer, I knew I wanted to make something I could use togheter with more than one costume.

I had also noticed a big hole in my costuming closet – outerwear.

I didn’t have anything to wear when traveling to my upcoming costume events. I needed something that would keep me warm yet not mess up the dress worn underneath. It would also need to work both with my medieval dress and an upcoming 1850s gown.

So when reading the challenge recuirement I noticed Lemomoni mention “cape”, and knew it would be perfect.

A pretty medieval cape…121_large

And some Victorian.

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After searcing a bit on the internet, comparing the medieval cape to the victorian one, I decided to make a short cape with a fur-trimed hood. It would not be strictly historical, but it would serve my purpose for a multi-functional garment.

I bought some brown velvet and a piece of brown faux furr.

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I draped and drafted a “quic and dirty” pattern, and started to cut the pieces.

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I sewed the cape together, tucked the seams and attached the hood. I marked the lenght, and cut and hemmed the cape.

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Then it was time for the fur. I cut stripes and sewed them on the front edges of the cape and hood. Then I sewed a hook and eye for closure at the neck.

Finished:

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Just the facts:

Challenge: 22 – Masquerade

What: A short cape

Year: 1300-1900 (sort of)

Pattern: None, drafted my own.

Fabric: 1 m brown velvet and 0.2 m faux furr.

Notions: Thread and hook and eye.

How historical accurate: Not much, but I think the look of it will suffice for several periods.

Time: 8 hours

Cost: 100 Sek (11USD)

First worn: On the 9th of november, at a Medieval fiest.