Regency Apron – Photoshoot

For the photos of my new apron I wanted to try to copy the inspiration print s much as possible, and since I haven’t made the rest of the outfit, I picked some pieces from my existing costume wardrobe that would some what give the right look.

I’m wearing my white regency evening gown, regency stays, cap, fichu, mittens and a few different hats and bonnets (like my green silk 1860s, brown velvet 1840s) for props.

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Behind the scenesimg_2436

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Regency Apron (HSM 1/2017)

Since my plan is to go for easy pieces this year (yeah, Erhm, sorry that ship’s already sailed) I decided to submit a lovely piece of clothing I started sometime this fall and only finished a little while ago.

Namely this pretty Apron:8b05963d5ee97df4f28e42f9f5f09e09I loved this print since I first saw it and been wanting to re-create it for quite some time.

The first thing I did was to dig up a piece of soft cotton satin in a lovely dark green color, which I scored for basically nothing at a flee-market a while back.
The fabric was only 1 m long but that was exactly enough.img_2191Some creative cutting (without piecing, Yay!)

img_2198I started by hemming the sides, and  bust “flap”, using my sewing machine, since sewing time is scarce at the moment.

Then I stitched and turned the tubes that was to become the shoulder straps.img_2200

The hardest part was to figure out the bust flap and the closing, since I wanted to be able to wear it in several different ways (Flap up/down, Straps straight/crossed at back)img_2228I ended up only attaching the flap at the “waist” so that it could either be folded down (hidden) or pinned to the straps if worn up.

Then I marked the buttonhole placement, and stitched them (using my machine). img_2232

I finished by adding the buttons, and a 10 cm wide piece of linen to the hem to give it some weight. img_2313

The finished apron:
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Bust flap down and crossed straps in back: img_2302

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Just the facts:

Challenge: 1/2017 “Firts & Last”

What: a Regency apron

How It fits the challenge: It would be one of the last pieces you put on before leaving the house/doing your chores. It’ also the my first venture into the late Regency/early Biedermeier but not my last since I now wish to make the whole outfit from the inspiration print.

Pattern: None, I drafted my own – It’s basically a trapeze with shoulder straps.

Fabric: 1 m green cotton satin and 15 cm white linen for hem binding.

Notions: Thread and buttons

Historical accurate: Besides from the machine stitching and maybe to “weak” fabric I would say it is pretty good. The shape is good and the construction is plausible. about 6/10

Time: About 4 hours – figuring out the construction took the longest time.

Cost: 30 Sek (3 Usd) – got to love those flee Market bargains.

First worn: Mid January for pictures

Final thoughts: I think it looks pretty good, and helps “dress down” my more fancy frocks in a pretty way.

18th century Tavern Maid – Accessoares

The days leading up to my planed “18th century Maid“photoshoot, I worked on getting all those small items and accessories in order.IMG_5489

Here are some of the things I made and used to get the look just right:

The leftovers from the jacket (part 1. & part 2.) I turned into a simplified version of a 18th century pocket. IMG_5867Cutting the pieces in front, back and strength fabric – all of which was almost unusable scraps to begin with.

It was such a quick project (took about 2 hours, once I figured out how I wanted it).
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IMG_6087In hindsight I should have made bias tapes for the opening as well, but suppose I didn’t had enough fabric anyway.IMG_6090

I also made a new fichu, since I wanted something les fancy then my regular silk one.IMG_6105It’s basically a cut triangle, with hemmed edges.IMG_6106

I re-used my white apron, but shortened it about 12 cm to get it to fit lenght of the skirt. IMG_6103IMG_6102

I also used my “old” cap (made it a couple of months ago) paired with a orange/sierra ribbon.IMG_6097

The final touch was to ad a cross, which I bought on sale in January for about 10 Sek (1,6 Usd).IMG_6100

IMG_6107Everything a proper maid will ever need.

A 1m Apron

For the HSF Challenge 25: 1 m – I decided to make something simple. As the prevous challenge been a pretty demanding dress (1840s checkered green dress), I needed to slow down a bit and make a simple yet versetile and wearable piece.

So I went through my stash and found the remaining pieces of this lovely checkered cotton voile, prevously used in my Renesance shirt and 18th century coif.

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The remaning fabric was a 0,3 x 2,5 m long piece. And I decided to make an apron out of it, even though it ment piecing three pieces of 75cm fabric togheter.

So that’s what I did.

Cutting the long strip in three pieces and piecing them to each other at the vertical seams, and whipstiched them down. Then I gattered the waist, sewed on a waisband with ties and hemed the whole thing.

Quick and simple.

IMG_4089You can’t even see the piecing.

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Just the facts:

Challenge: 25: 1 m.

What: A Simple Apron.

Year: 1500-1900

Pattern: None

Fabric: A leftover piece of 2,5 x 0,3 m ivory cotton voile.

Notions: Thread

How Historical accurarte: I didn’t use any historical model when making this apron, but figured they were made aproxemetly the same way all through history. So I give it a 7/10.

Cost: 0 Sek (Stash and remaning pieces project)

Time: About 5 hours.

First worn: On the 19th century theemed christams party dec 14.