1920s Sparking Evening gown – Photoshoot

And here comes the photos of me wearing the 1920s dress.
 Photos by: Elin Evaldotter

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1920s Sparkling Evening Gown (HSM 6/2017)

Since my first planes for the HSM nr 6/2017 fell through, I needed to think of something else to make.
Stuck in the 1920s as I where, I quickly decided to use on of my old fabrics (you know the ones you bough really Loooong ago, when you were “young” and foolishly though everything poly and shiny was pretty).I still think this fabrics pretty, sort of, but now I’m all to aware that sequined polyester lace was not a 1920s thing.

Anyhow I figure if I ever’s gona use it now might be the time.

Unfortunately I only had about 1 m.

Not enough for a dress – how small the 20s fashion ever might be compared to my usual stuff.

Hm, how to get that little amount of fabric to cover the body?

By making really low necklines and short hemes of course.

like the V-necks in this fashion plate or the pattern from “Waughs Cut of Womens clothes”

So I though of the brilliant idea to cut the lace in half almost at the bias to create the triangular pieces that would make up the bodice. only trouble was I forgot to mirror the pieces for the second cut – which of course left me with 4 identical trapezes pieces of fabric (and not 2 left and 2 right which I needed).

Crap!

I had absolutely no fabric left, not even scraps, so I experimented with using the wrong side of the fabric for two of the pieces.
No, that would not work, neither esthetically or functionally, since the sequins would snatch hold on the lining or underdress.

So I decided to try to fix my mistake by also cutting the pieces the correct way. Which ment they would need to be mended back together form the first cut. This resulted in slightly smaller pattern pieces and a mend that would hopefully not be this obvious with selveges cut down and worn over a underdress.

I experimented on my dressform to get the sizing right and cut and stitched as I went along, deciding on a knot for the front to make it easy to adjust and to create some interest in the otherwise simple design.    I also found the perfect little dress (on sale) to use as a slip.The dress worn open.

The Finished dress:

Just the facts:

Challenge: 2017 nr 6 – Metallics – make something in silver, gold, bronze, and copper, whether it be an actual metal, cloth of gold or silver, or lamé.

What: a 1920s silvery palette party gown

Pattern: None – I just cut and stitched

Fabric & Notions: 1,5m of white/silver palette lace in polyester and sewing thread.

How historical accurate: Not at all. Maybe the silhouette would be passable but it lacks lots of the refinement the dresses of the time possessed. i’ll give it a 3/10.

Time: About 6 hours (most of which I spent scratching my head and cursing, wanting to trash the damn thing).

Cost: About 50 Sek (5 Usd), found the fabric in the clearance bin several years ago.

First worn: Beginning of July for photos.

Final thoughts: I can’t say I’m particular happy about this dress. The dress itself are fine, but the road to make it was only trouble and the fit is strange on me (it requires a smaller figure). But I am glad I pushed through and finished it despite everything, then again I’ll be reminded of it every time i find some more lost sequins in my home (which will probably be for several more years)

 

1920s Turquoise 1-hour daydress

For the HSM June challenge – Metallics, I wanted to make something easy and fast, an using fabric from my stash, so I decided to make a 1920s “1-hour dress” from the remnant of the slinky (devilish) Rayon charmouse I used for my Greek dress a few months back. 

I used the pattern layout guide from “The Closet Historian“, and got cracking.
The cut fabric

And the stitched dress (and Yup, I used the serger…)

After stitching the sides together, I put it on the dressform to see the over all look. Looks ok 🙂

Then I hemmed the neckline, sleeves and bottom and made a belt of the remaining fabric scraps.

While debating what to make for the challenge I realized that the word “Metallic’s” didn’t, as I first though, equals “Jewel-tone”, so my Turquoise dress did in fact not qualify for this one.

So I made planes to bling it out with some pretty beads or trimmings, and got as far as buying a nice silvery trim, before I realized I couldn’t find any nice way to attach it.
I tried a lot of different variations and didn’t feel happy with anyone.
It does look pretty in this picture, but I’m telling you, it didn’t in real life.

So I decided to scrap the whole “bling it out” idea, and just call it a day.

So without further ado here is the (Not HSM worthy entry) finished dress.

The finished dress:

The facts:

What: A 1920s daydress

Pattern: Made my own based on 1-hour dress layouts from the internet.

Fabric & Notions: 1,5 m of turquoise rayon charmouse and thread

Time & Cost: About 6 hours (1 hour my ass…), and 100 Sek (10Usd) for the fabric.

Final thoughts: It is a tad small over my hips but otherwise it turned out better then imagined. The making of took a lot linger then expected though and the fabric was the devil to work with:-(

19th century Spring Coffee in Old Town

Two weeks ago me and my sister attended a small gathering of historic enthusiasts for a “Fika” in the local “old town”.

Once me and my sister spent way to long getting ready, we took the bus to the location and hurried to catch up with the others.
We all invaded a small coffee shop, and caused a stir in the other guests who (as usual) wanted to take photos.

It was a lovely event and besides the historic clothes it almost felt like an ordinary “fika” with friends.20150315_153231

20150315_153239My sister looking fab, in her Edwardian outfit and Hairdo.

20150315_154639What’s that over there….?”

20150315_154611Sara (the initiator to this meeting) asked everybody to tell a bit of our costumes and we got the chance to really look at all the clothing and ask questions. Here is Sara in her gorgeous 1880s bustle ensemble.

20150315_154831Yvonne wore a colorful regency gown, paired with turban made from a shawl.

20150315_155723Those 18th century stays are to die for, and she paired them with a great plaid skirt, apron and of course appropriate head cover.

Then we went outside to chat some more and to take even more pictures.IMG_61961920s backsides

Both Denise (left) and Pernilla (right) are in my historic sewing group.
And they made their dresses just in time for this event (between studying and exams).
Pernilla also writes of this event on her blog “fashion of the days gone by”, read the post here.IMG_6174Let me just say how much I love both their outfits, and those shoes! OMG, I definitely need to get myself some 1920s styled pumps.

IMG_6172It was a bit chilly, so we all had our outerwear on most of the time.

IMG_6191Karin is showing her bloomers beneath her lovely plaid skirt.

IMG_6193Hair and hat detail

IMG_6176“Do my bum look big in this?” – Yes and I love it!

IMG_6198There was no end to Saras wardrobe – Here she’s wearing a Dolman, made from a Truly Victorian pattern, with the most delightful swoon to the back.

IMG_6183I’m not even sure what Dan is doing – lets just say he looks great in his red and white self made ensemble.
Ludwig looks as smashing as ever in newly made plaid breeches and well groomed facial hair.

IMG_6180Me and sis in our Edwardian gear.

IMG_6200Warm ad cosy in velvet and fur.

IMG_6189Gibson hair side view

IMG_6185The obligatory shoe shoot

Of course we posed for photos to. IMG_6160

IMG_6170Fashion from Regency too 1920s – all in one pic.

Thanks to everyone who attended, it was so nice meeting you all. And lets hope we can do this again sometime.

1920s Glittery Robe de style

I’ve been set on trying my hand at 1920s fashion since the last challenge, nr 24 “All that Glitters”, was announced.

Not quite getting over myself to do the full straight/boyish figure, I settled on this design from “Fashion in Detail”IMG_4347

I drafted the pattern and started cutting the pieces from a lovely black cotton velvet I bought for this purpose.IMG_4229

The skirt are cut like a circular one, but using a square instead of a circle.
I originally planed to level the skirt and to hem it to be circular, but once cut I liked the square hem better. IMG_4238

I used some silver/glittery soft tulle, I got on sale about two years ago, as a second layer for the skirt.IMG_4231

IMG_4372Here you can see the shape of the square pattern, and the finished skirt hanging in tapered edges.

I pinned the dress together and put it on my dressform to get a view of how it would look
– And it looked hideous.

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I then tried it on, and the result was no better.IMG_4345

It was around here I really started to look for a dress to buy and wear at new years…

Determent to finish before the challenge deadline, I pushed on and stitched the dress together, aded the zipper, set the sleeves and neck facing, and marked the angel of the skirt.IMG_4368

It do looks better, but a mock up wouldn’t have hurt…IMG_4373

I finished of by shortening the sleeves a bit, cutting and hemming the skirt and making a belt out of some left over velvet.

The finished dress:IMG_4734

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A sneak a peak from the photoshoot:IMG_4391

Just the Facts:

Challenge: nr 24 – All that Glitters

What: a 1920s evening dress (sort of a Robe de Style)

Pattern: I drafted my own.

Fabric: 2,5 m black velvet, 2 m silver printed black tulle and scraps of black cotton for facing.

Notions: Thread, zipper, 2 hook and eyes and fusible interfacing for the belt.

How historical accurate: I’m not sure, but even though the fitted bodice are un-characteristic for the 1920s the style did exist. The construction methods are modern and the silvery tulle are also to modern. Conclution, maybe 4/10.

Time: About 10 hours

Cost: About 300 Sek (48 Usd) but I only spent about half since most of the fabric came from stash.

First worn: on dec 22 for photos. I planed to wear it for new years eve but I’ve changed my mind in the past few days.

Final thoughts: I actually like it much better now that it is finished, and I will deferentially wear it if I ever get invited to a 1920s themed party.

Allers Pattern Magazine 25 Mars 1925

Since I don’t have anything new to show you just yet I decided to post some pics of another one of my “Allers Pattern Magazines”.
And look! The cover are in color!

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IMG_9332Sewing instructions and pattern layouts.

IMG_9334And look there is patterns to.

IMG_9335Hm, wounder which lines to use…

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IMG_9337This right one is adorable.

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IMG_9341I need to make this jacket someday.

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