2017 – Planing Ahead

As we go deeper into January 2017, its time to plan this years sewing.

Yay!

This year I did things a little differently then usual (where I just pic ALL the things), because having a small baby really eats away of your sewing time 😉
So, this year I picked All the things I want to sew..

…and then I removed half of them.
All costumes with lots of pieces/decorations/complicated (and time consuming) elements had to go. Sorry, Not sorry.

Then I took a hard and “realistic” (yeah right) look at what was manageable with approx 1-3 hours sewing a week (more, if I could use nap time at its fullest but that’s hardly likely).

Then I took a look at my stash (because after half a year of maternity leave you really need to cut back on the excesses, like fabrics) and added that account into the ekvation.

And lastly I run everything through the eyes of the “Historical sew monthly” and possible events to come, and tried my best to match everything up.

So, after lots of forth and back, here is what i plan to make during 2017:
(Presented through the HSM17 lineup)

 The Historical Sew Monthly 2017:
(January-July)

January:
Firsts & LastsCreate either the first item in a new ensemble, or one last piece to put the final fillip on an outfit.

8b05963d5ee97df4f28e42f9f5f09e09I begun the work on the apron on this fashion plate back in December and it will be both my first entry into 1810-20s (late Regency), and possibly the last piece of this ensemble I can finish this year (even though I would love to make the dress and bonnet as well).
And for the purpose of this challenge the apron will be the first item on this ensemble and the last ting to put on before leaving the home.

February:
Re-Make, Re-Use, Re-Fashion
Sew something that pays homage to the historical idea of re-using, re-making and re-fashioning.

For this one I have two dresses that I would love to re-make to a better fit and perhaps even a better design.

IMG_2031 This 1780s Robe needs to be fitted better over my “new” stays, and perhaps let out a tad in the sleeves.

IMG_0522This 1910s evening gown needs a nicer back closure, and I think it would look better with the draping a bit more stitched down and controlled.

March:
The Great Outdoors
Get out into the weather and dirt with an item for outdoor pursuits.

I’m not quite sure on what to make for this one yet, but I would love to make either a Regency Spencerempire2

Or this 1910s wrap cape.4208693c640de62d4b97f0ac6ec639fdBeautiful, Isn’t it?

Another thing I’m contemplating is to make a 18th century hair decoration to match the brown Robe Anglaise above. fbac9dca5d32b7a9e85ab39e839c26ea 650e2205c62d97b75a2e1ba7ad3e4a16
Something like these two mixed up

April:
Circles, Squares & Rectangles
Make a garment made entirely of squares, rectangles and circles.

1237560510215538790warszawianka_chiton_clothing-svg-hiOn this one I plan to keep it simple with a Greek Chiton or Peplos made from one/two big rectangles of fabric.

I might also get time to make the frilly 1820s bonnet from January’s fashion plate.

May:
Literature
– Make something inspired by literature.

Also not sure on this one.
I would love to make a new Edwardian evening gown (if some of my fabrics speaks to me)mode1910-2

Or a green Regency day dress (or maybe a Pelisse) out of a pretty cotton fabric I’ve been sitting on for a few years now.5880ee0d1aa5d43db828e03caa587e55

Or I might just take this opportunity to finish my Robe a la Franchaise (begun in 2014)
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The literature reference won’t be hard to find on either of them.

June:
Metallics
make something in silver, gold, bronze, and copper, whether it be an actual metal, cloth of gold or silver, or lamé.

I was planing on making one of these 1-hour dresses from the 1920s in a lovely turquoise jewel toned fake silk, but now that I read the challenge description again I realize that won’t do.ladda-nedPerhaps I can add some sparkle or a nice piece of jewelry to go with the dress, to make it fit the challenge criteria better.

July:
Fashion Plate
Make an outfit inspired by a fashion plate, whether it is a direct replica, or a more toned down version that fits the resources and lifestyle of the character you are portraying.

Another Regency piece I’ve been coveting for a while is a greek inspired over robe like his one.eveningfulldresslabelleassembleeapril1811

For the rest of the year (Aug-Dec) I want to wait a bit to decide what to do, since life and priorities change depending on sewing time/up-coming events or new interests.

So the last 5 challenges will be decided later this spring/summer.

AugustRidiculous 

SeptemberSeen Onscreen

OctoberOut of Your Comfort Zone

NovemberHSF Inspiration

DecemberGo Wild

Here is however some of the things I’m thinking about

A new 17th century evening bodiceelizabeth-capell-countess-of-carnarvon-ca-1665-sir-peter-lely

A 15th century Burgundian gownspinning-women1

A sheer Regency gown to dress up/down depending on occasion. 28187ad2219cb5718f1b8e6e7609ab73

A man’s Regency waistcoatk4202drw

Of course I also plan to make lots of new baby clothes and perhaps one or two modern dresses/shirts for myself.

Lets see what I can get done 🙂

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Elizabeth I – Costume analysis

One of the costumes I wanted to make since I first became interested in historical costumes is the yellow dress from the Movie “Elizabeth” (1998), and last year I decided it was time.
The October theme for HSM2015 was “Silver screen”,  and since I acquired the perfect fabric a couple of months before I made grand plans to make the dress during the fall.

Then life happened (Jupp, baby haze), so this summer,when I finally had the energy to once more dream of pretty dresses, the yellow dress was not far from my mid.
And then when the HSM16s theme “Hero”, lined up with an growing itch to sew and grand planes for Halloween, I knew that the time had come, at last.

So lets take a look at the Dress:

(Pictures from “Costumers guide“)
elizabeth-1It’s made in a yellow/golden brocade with a snakeskin feel to the fabric.
The bodice are stiff and ends in a deep point at center front.

ref5The skirt are worn over layers of petticoats and probably a big bumpad to get the hips really wide and rounded. It’s either parted at front over a identical petticoat or pleated to look like it’s open. I think its the later, which you can better see in other pics.

ref17The line of the dress are slim and soft with a flat bodice front and rounded hips.

ref19The skirt are pleated  to the waist all around and opens up at the back. Even though you can’t see it in this pic I’m fairly sure the bodice laces up the back (as most of the dresses in the move has this somewhat un-historical feature). You can however see the sleeves and the delicate buttons (which I later decided to leave of my version).

ref26The neckline is square with a slight angle.

ref31Behind the scenes worn with a neck-ruff.

ref23The dress is worn during the coronation styled with a massive coronation robe and beautiful regalia.

fidm1Here you can better see the pleating of the skirt and the impressive point on the bodice.

2f65df3f3eea3f0f56e60e15cd347accI’m actually not sure if this picture are of the movie original or if its a great copy but i’s beautiful on the les.

english-school-koenigin-elisabeth-i-in-kroenungskleidern-123215The painting the movie based everything of.

Jewelry fit for a Queen

Earlier this year, when planing one of the major costumes (If you follow me on Instagram you already know of which costume I speak) I wanted to attempt this year, I stumbled upon the perfect accessories in an Etsy shop:
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Namely this set of Tudor jewelry.
14191863_10210265175087409_1931442235_oPhoto from “Evil-Ogis-GarbRecycled-Rockstah”

Not only did it include all the pieces I ever dreamed of (ok, minus a ginormous tiara ;-)), but you was also to chose the color of the pearls, metal and chokade pieces. Yay!

14215307_10210265175567421_107739505_oPhoto from “Evil-Ogis-GarbRecycled-Rockstah”

There was Sooo many colors I wanted (imagine Ruby red, Smaragd green or beautiful Amathyst), but I finally settled for a ivory pearl, gold metal with a auburn chockade.

In my hurry to order I accidentally hit the “Buy” button twice. Ops!
But before I had time to send an email explaining my mistake, I got a message asking if I indeed meant to buy two sets or if they should cancel one of the orders. Talk about costumer service 🙂

Then all there was to wait…

14203439_10210265181327565_285637099_o …for the package.

It arrived in a lovely box14233846_10210265177007457_1855676599_o

with all my Tudor goodies insideimg_0734

img_0737Pretty!

Lets take a closer look:

Bust piece:img_0722This was the piece that I coveted most of them all. And it looks exactly as I imaged.

img_0725Lovely pendant at the center.

Girdle:
img_0727It have a chain in back for size adjustments which is really smart. My only wish is for the hanging front piece to be a little bit longer, like you see in portraits of the time, but I get that that would give it another price.

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Necklace:img_0717

Earings:img_0712

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The complete set:
img_0707You could never wear to much jewelry, right?

I’m so pleased with the set and love the color and quality of all the pieces. And think hey look great and really authentic for the period.
And just the other day I took them for a real test drive…

*I don’t get any financial (or other) gain for promoting this site or its products, but are simply a happy customer, who like to show things I like on my blog 🙂

Medieval Fair Söderköping 2016

A few days after I finished my “Borgia dress” it was time for it’s first outing – To the yearly medieval fair in Söderköping.

This year I had a hard time deciding whether or not I should go, and if I did, then in what way would I attend.
Because of the new baby…
The first thing I needed to decide was If I should go at all, and should I then take him with me?
And If I took him, should I breastfeed or give him the bottle (this is the million dollar question when it comes to clothing decision), and would it be better to wear something old and easy to wash (because, baby spit) instead of my new princess gown?

I had three dresses that I could wear to the event:

1. Italian renaissance
img_0504Pros:
New dress!
Never worn
Soo pretty

Cons:
“Booberella”
Difficult to wash and thous breastfeed in
Never worn….

2. Medieval Cote
IMG_3663Pros:
Comfortable and opportunity to wear a whimple
Perfect for the Fairs time period
Easy to breastfeed in
Well tested and trusted

Cons:
Thick wool = super hot
Difficult to wash
Worn a lot

3. Tudor Peasantsidan-solPros:
Easy to wear
Easy to wash and to breastfeed in
Cons:
Simple on the verge to boring

In the end the choosing was made easy by my boyfriend insisting he take the baby for the day and I go alone (well not alone, my sister was to come to).
This was to be the longest time away from Charlie I ever been, so lets just say I was les then focused when dressing in my gown (New Borgia gown for the win, because – New dress :-)) and kissing my boys goodbye.

img_0919The familiar scenery of Söderköping.

We meet up with the dance team and participated in the show (with only a handful of on-lookers)img_0890

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img_0900I really need to do something about that neckline (or work a bit more on my posture)…

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img_0913Ha ha, love this picture.
Some people do take the dancing a lot more serious 😀

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After the dance recital me and my sister took a walk around the market.

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img_0922Mmmm fabric….

We also took a few minutes to take some pictures by the big church (while trying our best to ignore the other visitors taking our picture).

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14689770_10210697130606027_928742329_oMedieval selfie 🙂

Before heading hoe we did a pit-stop at the fabulous fabric store, where I got lots and lots of cute baby fabrics.

1490s Borgia dress – Construction part 2 – Finishing

And here comes the second part on the construction of my “Borgia” dress (part 1)

tumblr_mc079qPab21r4sg4ao2_250The Main inspiration

As a new mom the time for sewing is a bit more restricted then before, but when the urge to create gets to overwhelming you sometimes need to do what ever needed to get the itch satisfied.  
14203599_10210265181927580_1854767540_o#multitaskingmom
He actually falls right asleep once carried, whether I’m handsewing or using the machine.

Starting where we left of, finished the skirt, sleeves and assembled the bodice I hated the dress. I was so frustrated I left it on the dressform several days before I got the energy to tackle it again.14191394_10210265180927555_1142277737_oBy then I’ve convinced myself that once finished it would look much better then limp and sad on my dressform. I also hoped the proportions would look much better on me then on the form.

So carry on I did, marking the lacing holes.
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14215727_10210265181247563_2038233614_oHm, what color to use…

img_0345Right side finished with lacing holes and trim.

Once the lacing was finished I stitched the sides of the bodice together and then it was time to put it on to14191493_10210265181287564_429470907_o img_0350
The fit is almost perfect (if you ignore the ridiculous low neckline).

The small lacing holes I’ve made needed a thin and delicate lace – one which would not hold the preasure of my not so small bust. So I added some lacing rings and a cotton cord (to be hidden beneath the stomacher) to take the stress of the pretty golden laces.img_0377

Then I added the lining to the bodice, fixed the front clouser, finished the edges of all the little laces (sooo many laces and lacing holes) and hemmed the skirt.img_0382

And that was that 🙂

The finished Dress
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Just the Facts:

Challenge: nr 1/2016 Procrastination – I’ve been wanted to make this dress for  long time, but only now (summer 2016) got around to make it.

What: A 1490s Italian Dress inspired by the TV-series “The Borgias”

Pattern: I drafted my own, using “The tudor tailor” for reference on the bodice.

Fabric: 4 m light blue satin (1 m wide) 1,5 m striped brocade, 0,5 m white cotton for lining and interlining.

Notions: Thread, buttonhole thread, 6 m silvery ribbon, 3 m golden ribbon for front lacing, 3 m cotton lacing for internal lacing, 12 lacing rings, 2 m plastic boning, 0,5 m steel boning, 4 m blue furniture braid for decoration.

How historical accurate: Not that much I’m afraid. The fabric are all modern (polyester) and the sewing and construction was made using modern techniques and sewing machine. the style of dress itself are plausible but probably borderline fantasy. I must admit I’m not that knowing on this specific period. Maybe 5/10

Time: Way to long – I would guess about 20 hours over the course of 1,5 month, working in small batches of maximum 1 hour at the time.

Cost: About 200 Sek (16 Usd) – A real bargain! It should probably be more like 1000 sek (160 Usd)

First worn: For photos mid August and at a Medieval Fair late August.

Final Thoughts: I actually like it even though I feel like Booberella in it. The neckline ended up to low, and the way it closes in the front are not the best solution.
But I think this is one of the most decorated pieces I’ve ever made, and think it looks great.

Announcing the Winner…

To celebrate another year of blogging and getting lots of new followers, I wanted to give someting back to you all (or at least one of you😉) by hosting a giveaway (ending September 7).

And after meticolus consideration, no I’m kidding, I just pulled one name out of a ball.

The winner are:

Gabriella Salvador

(Who also run the faboulus blog pourlavictoire – go check it out)

Congratulation to your new fan!*

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Thank you to all who participated.

Love

Åsa

*Gabriella – It would be great if you could email me your shipping adress (asasomnasodesign@hotmail.com), and I will make sure to post the fan first chance I get. 

Thank you! 😀

 

Another year, another giveaway

And what a year it’s been…

Not only do I celebrate another year of blogging, but I’ve also had lots of great things happen to me in my personal life.

The biggest of them all – the arrival of my long awaited baby boy.
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After years of trying me and my long term boyfriend (who not long ago also became my fiance) finally found out we where expecting.

I kept sewing and pushing myself for bigger projects up until the point of exhaustion, but the day we found out about the pregnancy, was the day I quit sewing (at least for a while). I realized it was all to much, and I needed a break.

IMG_8890About two months pregnant, wearing the last ensemble I made during 2015.

And a break I had.

From Sewing, blogging and even reading costume related posts and articles on my phone.

IMG_20160515_194543_resized9 months pregnant, and almost ready to get back to sewing and blogging.

Now, almost a year later I slowly getting back to the urge to create and work with my hands.
I’m also back to blogging, all though not at all as frequently as before.

Now I only sew when I feel like it (and can get the time from my baby), and blog when I have something to share.

The strangest thing though, is that while on hiatus my Facebook page exploded in followers, going from like 200 the first year to another 400 these last couple of months. Getting the joke started about who I should just keep from posting at all…

… Which leads me to next good thing:

All my new followers 🙂

Whether here on the blog, Facebook (www.facebook.com/blog.fashionthroughhistory) or Instagram (www.instagram.com/fashionthroughhistory)
Welcome!
I’m so happy that you choose to read and take part in my costuming endevour.
Don’t be shy, I love comments and interactions, and tries to answer every question to the best of my ability.

By the time I’m writing this I got
270 followers on the blog
600 Followers on Facebook
and 480 followers on Instagram

I think that’s worth celebrating!

And what better way of celebrating all my new followers then with a giveaway to one of you

I recently acquired another one of my favorite wooden fan – And now I will gift it to one of you.IMG_0195

Bildresultat för wooden fan(This picture is from the wide world web, but I do have a very similar one that I will send one of you totally free of charge)

If you want to be in the running, you need to:

  1. Follow the blog (if you don’t already)
  2. Write a comment on this post – say “Hey”,tell me your favorite movie or what ever you want – I just need the comment to get you in the running. But I don’t object to some nice buttering up;-)

You all have until noon September 7 (Swedish time) to post your comments.

I will then randomly pull one person from my hat, announce it on the blog and send the fan to you. (I will need to contact you for your posting adress and information.)

Lots of love

/Åsa

Traveling with Baby – Medieval baby sling

For the easiest entry to HSM ever, I started looking into ways to travel with my little one.

Before the use of strollers and the intricate baby carriers that’s becoming more and more popular, people (read women) used the easiest way of tugging their baby’s along – a fabric “sling”.

I will not go into the use of slings and ways to travel with baby’s in past times, since others do it so much better, like Som när det begav sig (link in Swedish). A simple google search will also give you the history from (more or les reliable) sites – most of which sell modern baby carriers and shawls.

The construction of my baby sling/shawl was to make a rectangle 3 x 1m and hem the edges.
I then tied it around my body (under one arm and over the other shoulder) and placed my baby in it.

And that’s that.

And since I sewed it by machine it actually took longer getting dressed for the photoshoot then it did making the sling.

Photos:
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IMG_0226Photo: Maria Petersson
(I only let go of my hands for a second)

The Challenge: Nr 6 2016 – Travel

What: A baby sling

Year: 1500-1600s

Material: 3,5 m of ivory cotton

Pattern: None – I just cut a rectangle 1 x 3,5 m and hemmed it.

Notions: Thread.

How historically accurate is it? The fabric should probably be linen or wool, but since this was meant as a first try I think it would do. the machine stitching are on the other hand not at all accurate. 6/10

Hours to complete: 10 minutes

First worn: Beginning august for photos, but will maybe be used late August for a Medieval fair.

Total cost: 100 Sek (16 Usd)

Final thoughts This was such a cheat. It was way to easy and fast to really count, bu since I did have my baby (!) in June I think I can give myself a break.

Monochrome Medieval baby undies

Last fall when I took a break from sewing I also quit he HSM mid run.
But now it’s time to jump on the bandwagon (halfway through) again.
I have been sewing a few things that would fit the previous challenges this year (read all about them here) but lets start with July (since that the first one I managed o finish within the time frame of he month).

The theme for this HSM 2016 nr 7 was Monochrome, and I was eager to test my hand at some historic baby clothes.

Using my newly bought book “The Tudor Child” for the patterns for basic baby gear. IMG_0179

The Pattern for the shirt is fairly simple. IMG_0180

I cut the fabric in my favorite cotton/linen blend, and started by hemming the piece as stated in the instructions.IMG_0181

IMG_0183The folding pattern for the shirt.

Then I whip-stitched the hemmed edges together.
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Once the shirt was finished (it all went surprisingly fast considering I did it all by hand with a sleeping/feeding/squirming newborn in my arms) I moved on to the biggin/hat.

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IMG_0184The pieces cut from the same cotton/linen blend.

IMG_0191Hemmed pieces. I decided to ad ties to help keep the bigging on my baby’s head.

I did a slight miscalculation drafting the pattern making the center piece to long. IMG_0192Ops… 
But really, it was just to cut it of.

I also realized I messed up stitching the shirt.
The center is supposed to be open to get easy access for the baby, and since they are supposed to be swaddled (Yeah, No, that’s not going to happen with my baby) the opening would be completely covered in other fabric. so in the end I think this way was better for me.

The finished pieces: IMG_0282

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The Challenge: Nr 7 2016 – Monochrome

What: A shirt and bigging/hat for a newborn baby.

Year: About 1500-1600

Material: 0,5 m Linen/cotton blend.

Pattern: baby swaddling Shirt and Bigging from “The Tudor Child”.

Notions: Thread

How historically accurate is it? Pretty good. The pattern and sewing methods are good (except the mistake of stitching the shirt front closed). The fabric should be linen, but since I have difficulty finding a soft linen I think the 50/50 cotton blend I use are quite legit. About 8/10

Hours to complete: 4 (3 for the shirt and 1 for the bigging)

First worn: Beginning August for photos. Was meant to be worn late August for a Medieval fair, but I’m not sure anymore (see “Final thoughts”)

Total cost: 50 Sek (8 Usd)

Final Thoughts: It was really fun making these pieces. They came together so fats and the fabric was a joy working with. Unfortunately the Shirt ended up way to small for my fast growing baby – well guess I just have to make another one…